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Ideatrotter

Broadcasting Our Innovative Future Now

Posts tagged with ‘thought’

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This fun little infographic displays the results of a poll of 2000 individuals, showcasing what their bucketlists would look like if the world ended in 2012, based on the old Mayan myth. The most interesting phenomenon for me is that people, as you would have imagined, always mention they would like spend more time with family, discover the world or simply relax.
Why can’t bucketlists be actually implemented? It seems that because we constantly move, we are unable to stand still and, when given an ultimatum, we suddenly discover life’s brakepads. I would like to imagine that the next time this poll is taken, most individuals would say that they did everything they desired, within their means of accomplishment, and all that is left is plain destiny.  

This fun little infographic displays the results of a poll of 2000 individuals, showcasing what their bucketlists would look like if the world ended in 2012, based on the old Mayan myth. The most interesting phenomenon for me is that people, as you would have imagined, always mention they would like spend more time with family, discover the world or simply relax.
Why can’t bucketlists be actually implemented? It seems that because we constantly move, we are unable to stand still and, when given an ultimatum, we suddenly discover life’s brakepads. I would like to imagine that the next time this poll is taken, most individuals would say that they did everything they desired, within their means of accomplishment, and all that is left is plain destiny.  

The End of the World Travel Bucket List

This fun little infographic displays the results of a poll of 2000 individuals, showcasing what their bucketlists would look like if the world ended in 2012, based on the old Mayan myth. The most interesting phenomenon for me is that people, as you would have imagined, always mention they would like spend more time with family, discover the world or simply relax.

Why can’t bucketlists be actually implemented? It seems that because we constantly move, we are unable to stand still and, when given an ultimatum, we suddenly discover life’s brakepads. I would like to imagine that the next time this poll is taken, most individuals would say that they did everything they desired, within their means of accomplishment, and all that is left is plain destiny.  

Analyzing Transperancy and Translucency

Seth Godin (Brilliant Author, Strategist and Philanthropist) posted on his blog on February 18th, 2012:

Transparent or translucent?

There’s an argument for transparency. If you make it easy for people to see right through you, the thinking goes, you are easier to trust.

The market, though, often seeks out the translucent. Things that glow. We’re drawn to the glow, to the illumination and warm feeling it brings.

We’d like our tools and our replaceable institutions to be transparent. We want the bank and the radiologist and the tax man to be totally clear and invisible, so they can get out of the way and we can focus on what’s true.

But the brands and experiences and legends that lead to stories and affection and connection—it would be better if they glowed instead.”

My rationale is that both concepts, while important, have separate utilities. Transparency eliminates doubt, translucency breeds admiration. Both are central to managing everyday situations and evolving our inner self awareness respectively. Both, due to their different utilities, maybe required in different situations, depending on how much information is available and what is necessary at that very moment. 

“ I am not a champion of lost causes, but of causes not yet won ”

—    

- Norman Thomas, 1930

The above quote was selected by Sonia Sotomayor, President Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court, as her college yearbook quote some thirty years ago. Because of its author, a few have attacked Justice Sotomayor as having “socialistic tendencies”. But, if you consider the content of the quote rather than its author, does it really suggest a socialist world view? 

“ Until recently, memory problems indicated a deficiency in personal character, a shortage of “ethics or humanity.” This outlook was a sign of the times: Informational scarcity fueled an ethos of individualism. Today, advances in technology and technique enable vast quantities of networked information to be stored and retrieved cheaply, simply, and reliably. Information abundance fuels its own ethos where interdependency and mediation take center stage. Go to a party and brag about your ability to recall contact information. Nobody will toast your commitment to swimming against the tide of memory depletion. Instead, folks will tell you and your antiquated sensibilities to get a life and a smartphone. ”

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